Feeds:
Posts
Comments

Posts Tagged ‘mental health stigma’

This is an excerpt from my guest post on Where I Stand. Please pop over & check it out along with all the other great stuff on there.

“It doesn’t make sense to me that an illness of the brain has so much negative stigma around to it. Whereas an illness to the body is well, for lack of a better word, ‘normal’ and accepted. For me, it can only be explained through fear of the unknown.”

Advertisements

Read Full Post »

I’ve been pretty busy lately with one thing or another, but something I really wanted to get a post out about is Faces of Mental Illness.

I’ve been working with Laura SQ from Mrs Bipolarity & Laura P. Schulman from  Bipolar For Life, on creating the real faces of mental illness. Initially it was in reaction to Brian Williams’ stigmatising negative comments on mental illness. He stated of Ariel Castro, who held three Cleveland women captive for a decade was the face of mental illness. So, here we have an NBC Anchorman claiming this repugnant man is the face for people who suffer from all manner of mental illnesses. Such comments from a public figure can only do harm to any organisations out there trying to educate people & reduce the stigma around mental health.

As mentioned, this was originally what prompted the two Laura’s & I to start Faces Of Mental Illness. However, I’d like it to continue & evolve to show how people who have mental illness are more than the illness itself.

We have created YouTube, Facebook & Twitter pages, all entitled The Face Of Mental Health.

Youtube – Faces of Mental Illness

Facebook – Faces of Mental Illness

Twitter – Faces of Mental Illness

Please show your support by doing any of the following…send us a vlog to mentalfaces1@gmail.com. We’ll upload it to the Youtube page & share it to Facebook & Twitter. Don’t worry if you’re unable to do this. I know I wouldn’t have felt comfortable doing this a year or so ago. But please visit the pages & have a look at what we’re doing. If you like what you see please comment or like the respective pages. If you do want to show support, please share the pages on your own Facebook, Twitter & Youtube pages

Any suggestions or feedback would be greatly appreciated.

Read Full Post »

I came across this post on Weathering the Storm: Overcoming Bipolar Disorder, written by Kait. I want to reblog it, as it’s a great piece that highlights everyday stigma around, not just bipolar, but mental illness in general.

To go to the original post click here. I couldn’t find a reblog button, so I’ve also pasted it below, but the post looks better on Kait’s blog so give it a look. You won’t be disappointed.

 

……………………………………………………………………………..

Mental Illness Affects People Individually

Photo Credit: freedigitalphotos.net

 Those who live with mental illness are not all the same. They are not to be lumped into one group or meant to be labeled. They all have characteristics and diagnoses that are alike, but they don’t exhibit the characteristics in the same ways as another person might. They are individuals that will display specific symptoms. Not all symptoms that are listed under a particular illness will even apply to every individual with that illness. Some may display more severe symptoms and conditions, whereas others may only display some or a less severe form of the illness. Due to each person displaying individualistic symptoms and characteristics, it makes diagnosing and finding a successful treatment plan extremely difficult.

 What comes to mind when you hear that someone has a mental illness? Is a little part of you afraid or cautious? Does part of you automatically assume they’re “crazy” and unstable? Or maybe you feel shocked because they don’t appear to fit society’s image of a person who lives with a mental illness. They look and act just like everyone else. Well, that’s because they are like everyone else. They are human who just happen to live with different obstacles than others may. Some people live with food allergies and can’t eat certain foods, while some are diabetic and have to closely monitor their blood sugar. Those who live with a mental illness aren’t much different when it comes to lifestyle changes. They may have to monitor their moods, eating habits, and even their stress levels so they don’t have a relapse (mood swing, addiction habits, etc).

These reactions to mental illness are most certainly common when a person isn’t familiar with mental health. This is why it is ultimately crucial to expand the education and awareness regarding mental illness and the truth of the person behind the illness.

 Due to the stigma, some who live with a mental illness often refuse to share, speak openly about their illness, or even seek treatment that could save their lives due to what others may think and feel about them (or out of denial too, but that is a little different). They may feel ashamed, embarrassed, and weaker than others for having to seek professional help.

 It is sad to think that so many will suffer each year out of fear of getting the appropriate help they need. We, as a society, need to work on making it okay and be supportive of those who may need mental health treatment. Denial of the existence of mental health, apathy, and lack of empathy will not make these illnesses disappear. It may only make matters worse.

 So, the next time you hear or say “He/she is bipolar,” know that it is incorrect. He or she lives with bipolar is the more proper way of putting it because if a person has diabetes or cancer, you wouldn’t say this person is diabetes or cancer. It is a condition that they happen to live with which involves treatment. Same rules apply for those who live with mental illness.

Mental illness is not as scary as it appears in the media. Just because a person who is said to have bipolar (or another mental illness) did a terrible thing that gets displayed nationally over the news doesn’t mean that everyone who lives with that illness will end up doing the same thing.

 People who live with mental illness are individuals and it affects each one of them in different ways. Have a heart, spread awareness, and help a loved one ❤

Read Full Post »

BBC Three are currently airing a mental health season & last night ‘Diaries Of A Broken Mind’ was on. It focuses on 25 people chronicling their lives via a handheld camera. It was very insightful, as it literally gives you an inside view of people lives with various mental health issues.

As many of you will know I have bipolar…umm for those that don’t…eyes up to the top of the page…hear that? Yep a few pennies dropped right there 😉 Sorry I went of on a tangent there. So I have bipolar, but what this season of mental health programmes is giving me, is a wealth of information & knowledge on other mental health disorders out there.

Have a look at the episode I watched last night. I noticed the uploader’s comment on YouTube mentioned he’d received copyright infringement due to the music content in the programme. So if you can’t access this by the time you try let me know & I’ll change the link.

Let me know what you think?

I appreciate it’s a long documentary, so if you don’t have the time just click to 12mins in & watch until 13:30. This was my favourite part of the docmentary. Partly because of the amazing piece of music in the background, but also because it encompasses really well the stigma we face around mental health in just 1min 30secs.

Read Full Post »

%d bloggers like this: